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This article is from the book Awake! Realise Your Divinity!.

The Divine Advent

By

Sri Swami Chidananda

As we move towards the auspicious and blessed day of Sri Krishna Janmashtami, we are moving towards a divine advent that was extraordinary in its nature—extraordinary in the sense that there could not have been a more unimaginable set of negative factors all combining together than when the Supreme Being, Adi Narayana, was born as Bhagavan Sri Krishna. We cannot help wondering how and why such a thing could come about, that the moment of Lord Krishna’s advent was a moment filled with everything undivine, everything tamasic and rajasic, everything unspiritual and asuric.

On the other hand, it is said that at the time of the advent of Lord Buddha, everything became auspicious and beautiful. Though it was not the season for flowers to bloom, suddenly flower trees were full of flowers, trees bereft of fruit became laden with fruit, lotuses bloomed in the lakes. Waters of rivers that were muddy suddenly became crystal clear, and everywhere cool breezes wafted the fragrance of the flowers. Everything auspicious, everything beautiful, satyam, sivam, sundaram, took place. Lord Rama, too, was born in a palace—wonderful, auspicious surroundings.

Lord Krishna, however, was born in a set of circumstances most undivine, most unspiritual, most negative. He was born in prison; both His father and His mother were shackled to the walls, their hands chained. Their cells were closed, cut off, barred and locked with cruel guards watching them. It was midnight in the month of Sravana. It was pitch dark; the sky was overcast and it was raining heavily. Thus everything that the Bhagavad Gita says is inauspicious—night time, the dark half of the month, the sun on its southward journey—were present.

Lord Krishna, thus, had everything inauspicious; but even in such a set of absolutely inauspicious circumstances, there was ultimately a glorious triumph for the Divine. All that stood in opposition, all the asuric forces that time and again most determinedly tried to put an end to this advent were overcome. And one feature here that is noteworthy is that in spite of the most dire, inauspicious, unfavourable, asuric, dark circumstances—which seemed hopeless—Devaki and Vasudeva never lost faith.

They were absolutely certain that the divine advent would overcome everything that stood against it. There was in their hearts parama sraddha; there was in their hearts great visvasa, faith and trust in the promise of the Divine. It was this that enabled them to face all opposing circumstances and never lose faith. They had absolute trust in God, which made them strive through all the difficult circumstances and to ultimately have the blessedness of being liberated directly through the hands of the Lord.

Perhaps this is an indication of how the spiritual seeker, the sadhaka, the devotee, the aspiring soul has to be rooted in firm faith no matter how adverse the circumstances, how dark the prospects may seem. For, ultimately, if you persist in absolute faith, trust and devotion, and carry out the divine injunctions to the letter, then triumph is yours. You overcome all obstacles, become free and attain bhagavat svarupa. Lord Krishna Himself came to the prison house, took away their chains and made them free. This is the specialty of Krishna Avatara—extraordinary from start to finish.

May that Supreme Lord, who was born in adverse circumstances, in the dark of night under great danger and stress, who triumphed over all and came and liberated His bound parents, may this Lord shower divine grace and blessings upon you all and grant you success in your journey from darkness to Light, from unreality to Reality, from death to Immortality. This is my humble prayer!"


Last Updated: Sunday, 13-Aug-2017 23:08:23 EDT
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